Bear Lake Earthquake -

Date:                        10 Nov 1884
Name:                          Bear Lake, ID
Local Date (Time):       Nov 10, 1884  (1:50 a.m.)
GMT Date (Time):         Nov 10, 1884  (0850)
Location:                ~10 mi. SE of Saint Charles, ID
Epicenter:               42 00.00   111 16.00   [1]
Magnitude:               6.3  [1]
Intensity:               VIII  [1]
Felt Area:               15,000 Sq. Kilometers [7]

NEWSPAPER ACCOUNTS -

Deseret News - 10 Nov 1884

"DID YOU FEEL THE EARTHQUAKE"

This question passed from mouth to mouth, this morning, among neighbors in different parts of the city. "Yes" and "No" were the answers elicited. From several reliable sources we learn that about 2 a.m. a low rumbling was heard, which lasted a few seconds and passed; others felt a shaking which awoke them, and windows and pieces of furniture were affected by the vibration. Others heard and felt nothing at all, being sound sleepers. That it was an earthquake tremor there is but little doubt, as so many experienced its effects which though not violent, were plainly manifest.

[SPECIAL TO THE NEWS]

PARIS, Idaho, Nov. 10, 1884

Six distinct earthquake shocks were felt here this morning. The first, at seven minutes before two, was terrific and lasted over half a minute. Five other shocks, comparatively slight, occurred at brief intervals afterwards; the last at twenty minutes after four. The shocks were felt through the valley as far as heard from. Considerable damage to houses is reported, and some moveable articles were broken, although nothing serious occurred. People were affected as if by sea sickness. The movements of the first were severe shocks from northeast to southwest, and then a swaying motion from north to south. The others were from east to west.

13 Nov 1884

PARIS POINTS - Earthquake Incidents And Other Jottings

Brother Richard G. Lambert, of this office, who is traveling through the "north countree" in the interests of the News, sends us a few interesting fragments picked up in Paris, Bear Lake County, Idaho. He begins with last Monday's earthquake of which we have already heard something.

Says he: "This quiet town was startled this morning at ten minutes to two o'clock by an earthquake, the shock lasting at least half a minute. It was quite severe, causing ornaments to be thrown from shelves and a rattling among dishes. It was preceded by a rumbling sound resembling, as much as anything, a runaway team with a heavy wagon, or a heavy train of cars. It cracked the walls of houses and the first shock was followed by four lighter ones.

The town was thoroughly startled, some thinking that the end had come. One young man who drives a team, imagining it was running away, awoke calling out "Whoa! Whoa!"

In the office of Woolley Bros., a heavy clock was thrown from the top of a safe to the floor and broken. Sundry articles were cast from the shelves in their store.

The shock seemingly passed from north-west to south-east, and was felt at Evanston and north of here along the Oregon Short Line. At Soda Springs and Pocatello the shock was heavy and was felt at other places as well.

[Salt Lake Daily Herald; November 11, 1884]

Paris, Idaho, Nov. 10, 1884

Six distinct earthquake shocks were felt here this morning. The first, at seven minutes before 2, was terrific and lasted over half a minute. Five other shocks, comparatively slight, occurred at brief intervals afterwards; the last at twenty minutes after 4. The shocks were felt throughout the valley as far as heard from. Considerable damage to houses is reported, and some moveable articles were broken, although nothing serious occurred. People were affected as if by sea sickness. The movements of the first were severe shocks from northeast to southwest, and then a swaying motion form north to south. The others were from east to west.

Source of Information

1. Arabasz, W.J., R.B, Smith and W.D. Richins, Editors (1979). Earthquake Studies in Utah 1850 to 1978, Special Publication, University of Utah Seismograph Stations, Salt Lake City, Utah, 552 pp.

2. Arabasz, W.J., J.C. Pechmann and S.J. Nava (1994). The Magnitude (MW) 5.8-5.9 Earthquake in SE Idaho of February 3, 1994, and Associated Shocks, University of Utah Seismograph Stations Preliminary Earthquake Report, 5 pp.

3. Olig, S.S. (1995). Ground shaking and modified mercalli intensities, in The September 2, 1992 ML 5.8 St. George Earthquake, Washington County , Utah, Circular 88, Utah Geological Survey, p. 12-20.

4. Pechmann, J.C., S.J. Nava and W.J. Arabasz (1991). Seismological Analysis of Four Recent Moderate (ML 4.8 to 5.4) Earthquakes in Utah, report to the Utah Geological Survey for Contract Number 89-3659, 107 pp.

5. Pechmann, J.C., W.J. Arabasz and S.J. Nava (1995). Seismology, in The September 2, 1992 ML 5.8 St. George Earthquake, Washington County, Utah, Utah Geological Survey, Circular 88, p. 1.

6. Smith, R.B. and W.J. Arabasz (1991). Seismicity of the Intermountain seismic belt, in Slemmons, D.B., Engdahl, I.R., Zoback, M.L., and Blackwell, D., editors, Neotectonics of North America, Boulder Colorado, Geological Society of America, Decade Map volume 1, p. 185-227.

7. Stover, C.W. and J.L. Coffman (1993). Seismicity of the United States, 1568-1989 (Revised), U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1527, 418 pp.

8. United States Geological Survey (1994). Preliminary determination of epicenters: February monthly listing, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 32 pp. 

Bear Lake Earthquake of 1884 - Beware
Photographer: Michael L Jex - Location: Bear Lake Idaho -

 

 

Copyright 2002-2009 by Michael L. Jex & William R. Stirling